The Midwife's Daughter

The Midwife s Daughter Violet Dimond the Holy Terror has delivered many of the town children and often their children in her capacity as handywoman But Violet s calling is dying out as with medicine s advances the good

  • Title: The Midwife's Daughter
  • Author: Patricia Ferguson
  • ISBN: 9780241962756
  • Page: 203
  • Format: Paperback
  • Violet Dimond, the Holy Terror, has delivered many of the town children and often their children in her capacity as handywoman But Violet s calling is dying out as, with medicine s advances, the good old ways are no longer good enough.Grace, Violet s adopted daughter, is a symbol of change herself In the place where she has grown up and everyone knows her, she is accViolet Dimond, the Holy Terror, has delivered many of the town children and often their children in her capacity as handywoman But Violet s calling is dying out as, with medicine s advances, the good old ways are no longer good enough.Grace, Violet s adopted daughter, is a symbol of change herself In the place where she has grown up and everyone knows her, she is accepted, though most of the locals never before saw a girl with skin that colour For Violet and Grace the coming war will bring upheaval into their lives can they endure it, or will they, like so many, be swept aside by history s tide
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      Published :2019-07-11T23:30:50+00:00

    913 Comment

    • Laura says:

      From BBC Radio 4 Extra - Book at Bedtime:Set at the turn of the twentieth century, the new novel by Orange Prize listed author Patricia Ferguson is the compassionate and moving story of two sisters and the young black orphan who changes their lives.1/10: Violet Dimond has a terrible nightmare about her dead daughter but wonders if the dream may not strictly be her own.2/10: Violet has had a nightmare about her dead daughter, Ruth, and sets off to visit her twin sister, Be a, whose dream it may a [...]

    • Bettie☯ says:

      BABTBy Patricia FergusonRead by Joanna TopeBBC Blurb: Set at the turn of the twentieth century, the new novel by Orange Prize listed author Patricia Ferguson is the compassionate and moving story of two sisters and the young black orphan who changes their lives.Abridged by Robin BrooksProduced by Gaynor Macfarlane.#1 Violet Dimond has a terrible nightmare about her dead daughter but wonders if the dream may not strictly be her own.#2 Violet has had a nightmare about her dead daughter Ruth and se [...]

    • Kayleigh McHugh says:

      I really wanted to enjoy this book but I didn't feel it had a main focus It touched on racial issues, sibling rivalry, domestic violence, the perils of childbirth and the horror of war - yet seemed to attempt to cram too much in at once. So much so that I didn't feel an emotional connection with many of the topics as there was too much going on. Too much going on and yet nothing ground breaking really happening. The ending was odd and disappointing, I wasn't impressed overall. Charity shop for [...]

    • Olga Nikolaeva says:

      I did like the book a lot. Gripping, with a twist, keeps you up at night just to see what will happened. Especially her language! It is a bit like a roller coaster. You read through pages, carefully carried by the plot, and boom! Every time the tension heats up a sentence goes twist and turn and you have to go back and re-read it, wondering what just happened. I personally liked this a lot! Yet, the second book of the series (that I read first) was better. Most of all because of the plot's devel [...]

    • Derbhile Graham says:

      I'd actually give this book 3.5 stars. It was a tale told with love and great heart and the strength and dignity of the characters shone through. It beautifully portrayed the time period and the strains of growing up different to everyone else. However, the ending let it down - the pace change was inconsistent and introducing a minor character at the end seemed pointless.

    • Kate says:

      I know a sad ending can be very powerful and poignent and meaningful. but I think this book would have been better with a happier ending.

    • Lisa Trup says:

      Very strange ending.

    • Doreen Rhule says:

      A good read but I found the ending a bit untidy

    • Laura says:

      I enjoyed this book tremendously, I thought that her great success with the other children was good. I won't reveal what happens but suffice to say I thought it was a good read.

    • Mary Hughes says:

      Loved this book. Great sense of time and place and so much interesting social history. Sad, gritty, uplifting.

    • Brenda says:

      I Loved It - almost certain this one will be high on my list of top 10 books for the year!Set during the early years of the 20th century in an isolated village in rural Cornwall the story centres around Vi, the village woman/midwife and the child that she adopted after a visit to an orphanage that her twin sister Bea has charge of. The child is of mixed race and very sickly but Vi, seeing in her a resemblance to her own deceased daughter, nurses her back to health. We follow Grace's growing up i [...]

    • AshleyiSee says:

      It’s 1900, in Cornwall, England, twin sister’s Bea and Violet attempt to work through their strained relationship. A severely ill orphaned child lies in a lonely cot. Her eyes hold Violet, how alike they are to her own daughter that has passed away. There’s just one big difference; the nameless child is black. Regardless of her colour Violet claims the girl as her own, raising her along the seaside.Christened as Grace, she grows up in a racist world, praying to God that he turn her skin wh [...]

    • Lisbeth says:

      This is a wonderful book set in England in the beginning of the 20th century. It is about a midwife, Violet Dimond, who lives in a small town. Her husband is dead and her son has emigrated to America. Her twin sister Bea, with which she has never been of equal terms lives nearby and is running a home for orphans. On one visit Bea shows her a black girl of 2 years that has been found on the street. Violet is connecting to the girl since she reminds her of her dead daughter and decides to adopt he [...]

    • Mari says:

      This is a wonderful story, very readable, good on the history. While enjoying the story itself, you pick up on how midwifery was practised and changing in the period (early 20th century) , on social attitudes towards women, and towards anyone who is different. Gracie (the midwife's daughter of the title) doesn't realise for a while that others viewed her as different along with the children who were physically disabled (a boy with a club foot), had learning difficulties, or were 'not like the re [...]

    • Elizabeth says:

      I thought I would like this book but I was very disappointed. I could not work out what was the main story , it lost its focus. Violet Dimond was the local untrained midwife. She had delivered many of the local children. Set in the early 1900's Violet was gradually being replaced by Registered Midwives and not allowed to practise. Violet was a twin and there was considerable sibling rivalry. Her twin worked in a children's home, where Violet was allowed to 'adopt' a toddler. Gracie Dimond was mi [...]

    • Rebecca Isles says:

      Very mixed feelings about this book. I started off enjoying the beginning of the story about Violet, the local unqualified midwife who delivered babies and laid out people from not so wealthy town folk. Violet adopts a black daughter and this brings huge upheaval to her life. The story starts of well, with issues of race, class and kindness, but I found the middle of the book a little boring and the ending was such a disappointment. I did expect a happy ending for Grace after her hard childhood [...]

    • Margery Diamand says:

      The Midwife's daughter tells the story of Gracie, a foundling adopted by a midwife in turn of the nineteenth century Cornwall. The trouble is - Gracie is black. Patricia Ferguson has a rich, vivid writing style, and the characters leap off the page. She tackles a number of issues in the book: racism and difference, the jealousy and love been Gracie's adopted mother, Violet and her sister, Bea and the tragedy of the first world war and what this meant to ordinary young men. What stopped me awardi [...]

    • Den says:

      Started it a few months back and couldn't get into it.Tried again yesterday and finding it hard to put down. Never read anything by this author before but she is now on my to-read list. This story is all about Gracie, an orphan who is taken in by the midwife. If being an orphan is not enough to make heads turn and whispers start then being black in the 19th century is. She is a novelty to everyone around her and constantly is made to feel differently. As well as dealing with racism it helps us u [...]

    • Kay says:

      At the beginning got the 20th century Violet Dimond lives in s small Cornish community and makes her living as the woman that brings in the babies and lays out the dead. This is the story of Violet and her adopted daughter, Grace, a half cast child that she found living in an orphanage run by her twin sister, Bea. This is a fascinating about twins and their relationships with each other, and also how we are shaped by our identity or lack of it. We all need to belong to someone and somewhere.

    • Barbara Kilkenny says:

      I enjoyed some of the themes in this. I was delivered by my grandmother and she,like Violet, laid people out. The book seemed to be good in places. There were long stretches of narrative which failed to move the story along and were probably better suited to a social history.When the story took over it was both interesting and moving. The ending left us wondering about Vi and Bea and although the war had been a theme I found it strange that the war memorial scene was chosen to bring the story to [...]

    • Sandy Mahal says:

      This was an interesting read but not a memorable one. Started off well, the story builds and builds, touching on sensitive topics as race and class, but pretty anti-climactic at the end. The narrative is slow to get going, and it took me some time to get into the novel. About half-way through, there is a dramatic incident, and the story picks up pace. Then just as suddenly, it seems to flag again. Lacked structure. Plot unsatisfactory. The book may have benefitted from editing in places. Disappo [...]

    • Jo says:

      I thought this book ticked all my boxes, being a black/mixed race child being brought up in a very white environment in the early part of the twentieth century - and being about a handywoman/midwife around the time that midwife registration was being brought in - both of interest to me. I really enjoyed the first two-thirds of the book but the last part seemed disconnected and unrealistic. Having been quite engrossed in the story, I then became quite detached and disbelieving. It had such potent [...]

    • Janine says:

      This is a story of Vi, a midwife who takes on Grace, a black child, as her own. Grace has to face and overcome racism and prejudice at every stage of her life and Vi realises the decision to take Grace on will change her life in more ways than she imagined. There are a few twists and turns and a couple of times I was cleverly led into making false assumptions and surprised by the outcome.I was disappointed with the ending. I was left feeling a little flat and fed up!Worth a read though.

    • Sheila Khan says:

      Thought the idea for the story line very good and it started off well. I liked the characters and some of the descriptive passages but not the style of writing. She tended to wander a bit and I lost the thread in places and skimmed parts of it (maybe that is why I lost the thread!) Didn't like the end which came quite abruptly and the last chapter I found completely irrelevant. Don't normally write reviews but there were so many 4 & 5 star reviews for this book and I don't understand why.

    • Michelle says:

      I'm not sure what the message of this book was supposed to be. I felt like it was pretty anti-climactic at the end. The story builds and builds on the life of this young black girl in England at the turn of the century, but at the end she just all of the sudden goes away and the book ends from the perspective of a very inconsequential character in the book. The story is interesting and it's a quick read, but I was a bit disappointed with the ending.

    • Pam says:

      Beautifully written; so easy to read. I loved all the characters, especially grace. All those little details about life as a child and growing up with the difficulties she faced. Most no different from any other child. Carefully woven into the war setting which added a touch of reality and reminder of who we so tragically lost. So many different threads but brought together so well.

    • Jean M says:

      I would have given this book 4 if I had not found the middle portion to drag a little. I particularly liked the author's depiction of the attitudes of the people of that time towards anyone who was different in some way from the norm, in particular their attitudes towards someone black. Surprised by the ending, didn't feel right or complete somehow.

    • Gayle says:

      I read this after the sequel although the plot spoils don't really make a difference. I found it lacking in content, structure and pace - all of which there is good evidence of in Aren't we Sisters. On the plus side, the improvements between the two books make me very open to reading a third in the hope it follows the same trajectory.

    • Bronwyn Mcloughlin says:

      A enjoyable holiday read, about not so idyllic country life in Cornwall in the very early 20th century. Nothing startling, but well written and thoughtful, capturing a way of life long gone and quite imperfect.

    • Emma Bunday says:

      Above average but lacked focus. Good themes - First World War, sibling rivalry, racism, innocence, midwifery, to name a few - but too many of them made it a bit messy. Some characters not dele oped enough though central character of Grace was convincing.

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