No Sweetness Here and Other Stories

No Sweetness Here and Other Stories In this collection Ama Aita Aidoo explores postcolonial life in Ghana with her characteristic honesty and humor Tradition wrestles with new urban influences as Africans try to sort out their identity

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  • Title: No Sweetness Here and Other Stories
  • Author: Ama Ata Aidoo Ketu H. Katrak
  • ISBN: 9781558611191
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this collection, Ama Aita Aidoo explores postcolonial life in Ghana with her characteristic honesty and humor Tradition wrestles with new urban influences as Africans try to sort out their identity in a changing culture True to the tradition of African storytelling, the characters come to life through their distinct voices and speech If there is no sweetness, there iIn this collection, Ama Aita Aidoo explores postcolonial life in Ghana with her characteristic honesty and humor Tradition wrestles with new urban influences as Africans try to sort out their identity in a changing culture True to the tradition of African storytelling, the characters come to life through their distinct voices and speech If there is no sweetness, there is the salt essential to life, even if it comes from tears, and the strength that comes from a history of endurance.
    • [PDF] Download â No Sweetness Here and Other Stories | by ☆ Ama Ata Aidoo Ketu H. Katrak
      192 Ama Ata Aidoo Ketu H. Katrak
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download â No Sweetness Here and Other Stories | by ☆ Ama Ata Aidoo Ketu H. Katrak
      Posted by:Ama Ata Aidoo Ketu H. Katrak
      Published :2018-07-19T07:58:39+00:00

    855 Comment

    • Melita says:

      Well-written and, at times, funny.

    • Rachel Rueckert says:

      Aidoo does a great job of showing some of the current issues that are at the heart of modernization in Ghana today. These short stories have quite the range of perspectives to give a broad picture of what it looks like to be Ghanaian, whether you are living in a small village in the north or are living the city life of Accra. It also looks as the views of both men and women, elders and children, and this unique blend gives a very universal flavor to her themes and messages. In "Everything Counts [...]

    • Salma says:

      This book was so unexpected!!!It's actually made me love Ama Ata Aidoo so much more than I already did. It was a beautifully written book that made me feel the African vibe. The stories were basically set on normal African believes, settings and of course happenings in typical Ghanaian homes and societies. It was descriptive and understanding in addition to having a whole pile of lessons to teach. The characters were well defined, relatable and simply fantastic. They felt so real to the extent t [...]

    • Khadija says:

      wohoo Africa and the long way of modernization!!a changing and modern Africa is in its way to bornAma Ata Aidoo is the best one to describe this change and what it brings to the lives of the peopleif there was and may be there is no sweetness in Africa there is the salt essential for life may be just the salt that comes from tears and pain and black present but this all is too important for the future ;the brighter future of Africa and africans a brightness coming from the long years of struggle [...]

    • Adam Boisvert says:

      Ama Ata Aidoo is currently my favorite writer of African Literature (which might not be saying much, since I make no claims of being familar with the genre). Her stories do a good job of pointing out what's wrong while still being hopeful for the future. Some of the stories deal with village life and some have a more urban setting (and many deal with a character transitioning from one to the other), but they all present an Africa that is modern and changing. The titular story, No Sweetness Here [...]

    • Jessica says:

      These 11 stories explore a lot of universal themes, like tradition vs. modernization, family, parenthood, marriage and class structure as they relate to the people of Ghana. Aidoo's writing is often sparse, but poignant. She writes from both the male and female perspective as well as child's perspective, giving insight into many aspects of Ghanian culture during a time of great change. I'm still not a big lover of short stories, but I do think this collection showcases a great voice coming out o [...]

    • Siria says:

      No Sweetness Here is a collection of eleven short stories set in post-colonial Ghana. Aidoo has a wonderful ear for dialogue, and the rhythms and cadence of the language here make it rewarding to read aloud. A handful of the stories themselves I did like, but most of them fell flat for me—they felt quite dated, what may well have been new and fresh in the 60s just failing to capture me now. Worth reading for the title story and 'For Whom Things Did Not Change.'

    • Karen A. Lloyd says:

      One of the most thoughtful and adept collection of short stories I've come across.Aidoo skillfully weaves the problems and conflicts of post-colonial and transitioning Ghana into the telling of stories of ordinary Ghanaians who are navigating this beautiful country cusped between tradition and modernity.I am now intrigued to read more of her work. Esp. since she is particularly interested in the precarious plight of women who are arguably the most affected by transitioning states.

    • Stuart Aken says:

      Clearly not my sort of book. I found much of the language more or less incomprehensible due to the patois. It was difficult for me to find points of contact with the characters and I felt no real empathy with any of them. Obviously, this is a cultural issue and probably more to do with me than that the quality of the book.

    • viola says:

      a little too high-brow for me, but at least i can admit it. also, a little toofull-of-dialogue-and-almost-nothing-else for me, but i'm assuming this is related to the previously mentioned high-brow problem.but mostly the issue is that i don't know enough about ghana to put any of this in context. i should have read the history book i'm working on now first.

    • Brian Barton says:

      this is probably one of those most depressing things ever. An african woman wants a divorce but loses her son due to the culture then after the son is bitten by a snake and dies. she is left alone with nobody and no money. "what do you do when your only water pot breaks." is probably the line

    • Suvi says:

      Beautifully written short stories about the life and modern day struggles of ordinary people in Africa.

    • Kristine says:

      Interrelated short stories of post-colonial life in Ghana circa 1970.

    • Krysta Hand says:

      An amazingly poetic insider's look at thoughts, struggles, perspectives, lives of Ghanaians. Excellent.

    • Anna says:

      Powerful stories of life in Ghana, which I read while I was there in 1996.

    • roni says:

      lady ghanaian authors!

    • Tove says:

      Probably a good book, I just couldn't get through it

    • Boakye says:

      no sweetness here indeed

    • TruEssence says:

      I enjoyed the short stories in this book.

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