No Parachute: A Fighter Pilot In World War I

No Parachute A Fighter Pilot In World War I NO PARACHUTE is an exciting find a uniquely authentic collection of letters written by one of these unknowns a young pilot with the Royal Flying Corps RFC based in France in Following hot on th

  • Title: No Parachute: A Fighter Pilot In World War I
  • Author: Arthur Stanley Gould Lee
  • ISBN: 9780060125486
  • Page: 194
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • NO PARACHUTE is an exciting find, a uniquely authentic collection of letters written by one of these unknowns, a young pilot with the Royal Flying Corps RFC based in France in 1917 Following hot on the event, he recreates breathless dogfights between Sopwith Pups and Albatros fighters, the eerie sensation of flying at hedgerow level in a Sopwith Camel, the bitter cold NO PARACHUTE is an exciting find, a uniquely authentic collection of letters written by one of these unknowns, a young pilot with the Royal Flying Corps RFC based in France in 1917 Following hot on the event, he recreates breathless dogfights between Sopwith Pups and Albatros fighters, the eerie sensation of flying at hedgerow level in a Sopwith Camel, the bitter cold of high altitudes in an open cockpit, the panic of engine failure behind enemy lines all in all, among the most vivid anecdotes of air fighting to come out of the First World War.
    • Unlimited [Music Book] ☆ No Parachute: A Fighter Pilot In World War I - by Arthur Stanley Gould Lee ↠
      194 Arthur Stanley Gould Lee
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      Posted by:Arthur Stanley Gould Lee
      Published :2018-09-03T18:41:42+00:00

    784 Comment

    • A.L. Sowards says:

      This was a first-hand account of a British pilot who flew during 1917. It’s made mostly of letters to his wife and bits of his diary, all of them edited many years later to make the account more concise and add in things like locations that would have been censored during the war.Lee begins his combat career in the spring of 1917—it’s a time when the Germans have the better airplanes, and Royal Flying Corps casualties are high. Most of his time is spent in France, but his squadron also tak [...]

    • KOMET says:

      This was one of the best war memoirs I ever read. Arthur Stanley Gould Lee has an unerring knack for conveying to the reader the immediacy of the air war over the Western Front as he experienced it in 1917. The horror, the stress of combat flying, the loss of friends, and the relief from having survived yet another battle --- he makes it real.

    • Edward Lengel says:

      Truly superb account of aerial combat in World War I, conveying both the thrill and the terror of the experience. Goes in the top tier of the hundreds of WWI accounts I've read.

    • Jbondandrews says:

      I enjoyed reading 'No Parachute', it helped me to better understand what one of my ancestors went through as a pilot in the First World War.I read the hardcover version not the kindle.

    • Peter Goodman says:

      “No Parachute: a classic account of war in the air in WWI,” by Arthur Gould Lee (Grub Street, 2013; first published 1968). There really was a time when British, French and German fliers were almost airbound cavaliers, joyfully riding their fractious steeds up, around over and through the sky of Europe for fun, killing and being killed, getting absolutely roaring drunk and smashing up the place, and then going up and doing it all over again. It lasted for a few months in 1917, which is when L [...]

    • Ricardo Barragan says:

      Published 50 years after the first world war, No Parachute: A Fighter Pilot in World War I is a retelling of what happened three years into the Great War through the eyes of the author, beginning with Arthur as he enters the war as a fighter pilot for the Royal Flying Corps. Instead of being told through the reflecting of memories, the events are told through the letters Arthur sent to his wife, as well as the journal entries he wrote during the war. It is through these words that we see how the [...]

    • A. Volaticus says:

      Another amazing time machine - voices transmitted through the decades. Some human perceptions and emotions remain over time, others come and go, some disappear. These letters spoke to me, at the time I read it, a hawkish kid who was a senior in high school during the latter half of the Vietnam debacle. A different fight from Lee's, which seemed alternately to be: another epic fight between the good and the bad and another fight very unlike the disaster of 19114-1918 that engulfed Lee.In the end, [...]

    • David says:

      Excellent Account of the First Air WarThis has become one of the best accounts of war in the air in the First World War. Told with honesty--in letters to his first wife "in the Springtime of life"--Arthur Gould Lee weaves a tale of England's youth at war with all their trials and triumphs! Highly recommended!

    • Steve says:

      A great account of the author's experience as a fighter pilot in Great Britain's Royal Flying Corps during World War I. I like how it had sequence of events with the dates. I also enjoyed the description of the planes and the dogfights.

    • Hal says:

      My review of this book just disappeared. I'll rewrite it when I can regather my thoughts. Suffice it to say, for me this book is the gold standard for all books on WW I aviation.

    • Shawn Pillow says:

      Great book if you enjoy historical memoirs oriented around experience rather than the context of events in which they occur. Great entry point for reading more about WWI.

    • Bhall says:

      I am stuck on these WWI flying storiesis one is a diary from a British pilot stationed on the trenches near Ypres, Belgiumfascinating good read

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