In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature

In Search of the Irish Dreamtime Archaeology and Early Irish Literature Following his account of Irish origins drawing on archaeology genetics and linguistics J P Mallory returns to the subject to investigate what he calls the Irish Dreamtime the native Irish retelling

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  • Title: In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature
  • Author: J.P. Mallory
  • ISBN: 9780500051849
  • Page: 175
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Following his account of Irish origins drawing on archaeology, genetics, and linguistics, J P Mallory returns to the subject to investigate what he calls the Irish Dreamtime the native Irish retelling of their own origins, as related by medieval manuscripts He explores the historical backbone of this version of the earliest history of Ireland, which places apparently mFollowing his account of Irish origins drawing on archaeology, genetics, and linguistics, J P Mallory returns to the subject to investigate what he calls the Irish Dreamtime the native Irish retelling of their own origins, as related by medieval manuscripts He explores the historical backbone of this version of the earliest history of Ireland, which places apparently mythological events on a concrete timeline of invasions, colonization, and royal reigns that extends even further back in time than the history of classical Greece The juxtaposition of traditional Dreamtime tales and scientific facts expands on what we already know about the way of life in Iron Age Ireland.By comparing the world depicted in the earliest Irish literary tradition with the archaeological evidence available on the ground, Mallory explores Ireland s rich mythological tradition and tests its claims to represent reality.
    • Free Read [Classics Book] ↠ In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature - by J.P. Mallory Ò
      175 J.P. Mallory
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Classics Book] ↠ In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature - by J.P. Mallory Ò
      Posted by:J.P. Mallory
      Published :2018-07-09T08:32:44+00:00

    110 Comment

    • Corey Wrenn says:

      A thorough account of the construction of Irish history and legend across the millennia, this is an interesting account of how histories, knowledge, and cultures are built. It is also a chronicle of how colonization, war, religion, class, and global connectedness influence this construction. Rather ambitiously, Mallory explores the major historical accounts and legends, and then compares them to the archaeological evidence to ascertain fact from fiction. I certainly learned a lot about ancient I [...]

    • Michael says:

      I was a little disappointed with the book. It pretty much says that all the ancient stories set around 100 BC to 100 AD do not reflect reality at that time in any way. Instead they reflect the time the stories were written down, about 1000 years later, mixed up with details stolen from the Bible and items stolen from a Medieval Spanish Encyclopedia.The author also makes it a point that the monks could not have stolen any ideas from sources written in Greek, only Latin, which I found confusing si [...]

    • Renée says:

      Who would've thought I would roll from my chair reading this book. Mallory has such a witty writing style, I love it. Besides that it was an interesting read, with, to me, not too shocking results. I was wondering though why he did not take into account the fact that in the Middle Ages many stories (incl. Bible) we put in a contemporary setting as regards clothes etc just look at pictures where you might find eg a blonde Maria, or Roman soldiers fitted out with mediëval weaponry. I am not surp [...]

    • Bobby says:

      The argument is very thorough and well constructed. While I think many readers would have shared my hope that Mallory would find that the Irish tales do reflect real memories of the Iron Age and earlier, it's better to learn the facts based on detailed study and comparison with the archaeological record. Mallory also does a great job breaking up some of the drier parts with funny asides and analogies.

    • Sarah Adair says:

      This book examines early Irish literature in order to determine how much of its contents is based on history/oral tradition and how much was coloured in by the medieval monks who first recorded it.There are sections on different kinds of clothing, weaponry, animalse author looks at the swords, for example, found in the Ulster Cycle and then compares them to what we know of iron age swords, what we know of medieval swords, what we know of swords from classical literature/the bible, in order to de [...]

    • Maya says:

      Please see my review at Celtic Scholar's Reviews and Opinions

    • Miriam Joy says:

      Surprisingly readable and in places even funny, for an academic book, although some of the more detailed archaeological info was hardgoing for me as I haven't got any preexisting knowledge in that area beyond what I've picked up along the way. I can imagine it would make a pretty useful resource for someone trying to write a historical novel inspired by medieval Irish Lit -- it explores the potential realities behind the literary tropes in a fair amount of detail, insofar as that's possible. Unf [...]

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