The Knight and Knave of Swords

The Knight and Knave of Swords Ramsey Campbell the highly regarded British horror author called him the greatest living writer of supernatural horror fiction Drawing many of his own themes from Shakespeare Edgar Allen Poe and H

  • Title: The Knight and Knave of Swords
  • Author: Fritz Leiber
  • ISBN: 9780688085308
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Ramsey Campbell, the highly regarded British horror author, called him the greatest living writer of supernatural horror fiction Drawing many of his own themes from Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, and H.P Lovecraft, master manipulator Franz Leiber is a worldwide legend within the Fantasy genre, actually coining the term Sword and Sorcery , which would describe the sub Ramsey Campbell, the highly regarded British horror author, called him the greatest living writer of supernatural horror fiction Drawing many of his own themes from Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, and H.P Lovecraft, master manipulator Franz Leiber is a worldwide legend within the Fantasy genre, actually coining the term Sword and Sorcery , which would describe the sub genre he would than help create.While Lord of the Rings took the world by storm, Leiber s fantastic but thoroughly flawed anti heroes, Fafhrd and Grey Mouser, adventured and stumbled deep within the caves of Inner Earth as well, albeit a different one They wondered and wandered to the edges of the Outer Sea, across the Land of Nehwon and throughout every nook and cranny of gothic Lankhmar, Nehwon s grandest and most mystically corrupt city.Lankhmar is Leiber s fully realized, vivid incarnation of urban decay and civilization s corroding effect on the human psyche Fafhrd and Mouse are not innocents their world is no land of honor and righteousness It is a world of human complexities and violent action, of discovery and mystery, of swords and sorcery Fritz Leiber s tales of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser are virtually a genre unto themselves Urbane, idiosyncratic, comic, erotic and human, spiked with believable action of a master fantasist William Gibson After too long a wait, the master story teller of us all returns with a huge, anecdotal adventure in the magic drenched lives of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser Glowing imagination melds with gorgeous language to make this one of Leiber s very best which is a better best than this poor world usually has to offer Leiber s back rejoice Harlan Ellison It s all Fritz Leiber s fault If he weren t such a deadly fine fantasist I wouldn t be stopping everything to read his tales And if he weren t such a master I wouldn t occasionally look out of the window and wish he d interrupt my routine again, as he doesn t do it often enough The Knight and Knave of Swords came into my life and took over an otherwise fully programmed afternoon I stop everything when a new Fafhrd and Gray Mouser story comes into my hands Roger ZelaznyContents 9 Sea Magic ss The Dragon, December 1977 29 The Mer She nv Heroes Horrors, Whispers Press, 1978 63 The Curse of the Smalls and the Stars na Heroic Visions, ed Jessica Amanda Salmonson, Ace, 1983 117 The Mouser Goes Below na portions first printed as The Mouser Goes Below Whispers 23, 1987 and Slack Lankhmar Afternoon Featuring Hisvet Terry s Universe, ed Beth Meacham, Tor, 1988
    • Ú The Knight and Knave of Swords || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Fritz Leiber
      308 Fritz Leiber
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      Posted by:Fritz Leiber
      Published :2019-06-24T12:13:37+00:00

    927 Comment

    • BillKerwin says:

      Farewell to Lankhmar--the last volume in the Fafhrd and Grey Mouser series--is a strange book, and hard to evaluate. It is an old man's book with an old man's preoccupations, and the reader who expects the usual mixture of free-wheeling, picaresque adventures will be disappointed. His two aging heroes are now grudgingly monogamous men with daily responsibilities, settled in the arctic outpost of Rime Isle, far from the the sultry sexual multifariousness of Lankhmar. The two are literally cursed [...]

    • Wanda says:

      Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser Cranky Old Men editionWe’re old, we’re gray, get off our lawn.A somewhat unfair assessment of the last FatGM book by Fritz Leiber, who died 4 years after it was copyrighted, at age 81. A few statements within the first few pages seemed to indicate that he was writing to placate fans of the series—you know us fans, we are always clamouring for more adventures of our favourites! I imagine that it’s hard to scrape up enthusiasm for a project that feels rather forc [...]

    • Algernon says:

      an extra star for the overall enjoyment I got from this pair of amoral scoundrels. but Other reviewers pointed out that the last book in the series compares unfavorably with what went on before. I felt the decline in quality already in the previous book ( Swords and Ice MAgic ) but as a completist and as a fan of the Twain, I decided to give it a try anyway. Most of the dissapointment might come from the fact that I expected the adventurers to go out in a blaze of glory, something like the end o [...]

    • J.G. Keely says:

      Unfortunately, the last few collections of Leiber's epic series cannot measure up to his earlier stories. In this volume, he once again refrains from the short, punchy stories which won him fame. Instead, he writes a single slow-going, bloated story originally released in chapters, which means Leiber is constantly reminding us what we're reading and what happened.As we chart the ebb of Leiber's once-voracious imagination, each book has less semblance of plot, moving sluggishly between unimportan [...]

    • KatHooper says:

      The Knight and Knave of Swords is the last collection of Fritz Leiber’s LANKHMAR stories about those two loveable rogues, Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. I had read all of the LANKHMAR stories up to this point but it took me a while to open this book because I just wasn’t ready for it to be over. Neil Gaiman says something similar in his introduction to The Knight and Knave of Swords and I’m sure that most of Leiber’s fans feel the same way. I know I can re-read these stories at any time, bu [...]

    • Brian says:

      This is the wandering sword-and-sorcery hero fiction equivalent of the old guy down at the bar talking about how totally amazing things were back in the old days and how he got up to all these crazy adventures and he totally banged all those hot girls and their sistersmaids, too, and hey, where you are going, he has a dozen more stories that are even better than that one!I think the greatest enemy of sword-and-sorcery short fiction is continuity. Part of what made the earlier stories so interest [...]

    • Martin says:

      Some media is difficult to consume, when we know it will be our last taste. This is how I felt watching the last episode of The Wire, the last Morse mystery, and now reading this book. It's why I put off reading the last Dark Tower novel. Reading The Knight and Knave of Swords I was filled with melancholy. I'm certain I first discovered Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser when I was 10 or 11 years old, and while scouring used book stores happy to grab any of the paperbacks collecting their adventures. Th [...]

    • F.J. Sanz says:

      Como tengo por costumbre, comentaré esta saga al completo y no desgranando libro por libro.Para analizar las aventuras de Fafhrd y el Ratonero Gris es necesario ambientarse en su contexto histórico. Publicada la primera novela (Espadas y demonios) en 1970, la sociedad y valores no eran los mismos que priman en la nuestra hoy en día.Quizá haya quien se pueda escandalizar ante la visión tan machista que ofrecen sus páginas, donde sus dos héroes no buscan en el sexo opuesto más que la pura [...]

    • Silas says:

      Fafhrd, the towering barbarian, and his best friend the Gray Mouser, a cutpurse small in stature, are now middle-aged swordsmen with an abundance of adventures behind them. But the fates aren't through with them yet, and in this collection of stories, Fritz Leiber gives us more of their exploits. A rollicking read for sci-fi and fantasy fans.

    • Pedro Pascoe says:

      Aaand that's a wrap. The final volume of the incredible Swords series re-read. The first time I'd read the Swords series was very long time ago, but there was a very considerable gap (I'm talking around 2 decades) between book 6 and this final volume. This time around I had the context very fresh in my mind, which was mostly absent the first read around, as I'd largely forgotten the latter stories in the latter books, particularly Rime Island, and how they ended up there.The last, novel-length s [...]

    • Eric Hunter says:

      It took me quite a while to finish this book, the last in the series. Fafhrd and Mouser are middle-aged, and slowing down, somewhat, but they still have a disturbing attraction to young teenaged girls. This might not have raised too many eyebrows when these stories were written, but in the age of #MeToo, and Roy Moore, it is creepy.

    • Andrew Vice says:

      Boring.

    • Eloi Puig says:

      Ressenya en català (2003):elkraken/R-hermandad%2Reseña en castellano (2003):elkraken/Esp/R-hermand

    • Larou says:

      The seventh and final volume in Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser series, containing stories from the late seventies and eighties. This one was a bit different than the previous for me, insofar as it is the only volume I had never read before, as it had not been released (or indeed, written) yet the last time I read through the series. Knight and Knave of Swords is generally considered the series’ low point, and with very good reason – while Swords and Ice Magic was rather mediocre [...]

    • Newton Nitro says:

      No sétimo e último volume da saga de Fafhrd e o Gray Mouser, o surrealismo toma conta das aventuras da dupla. As histórias ganham cada vez mais surrealismo, em detrimento do aspecto épico e sujo das primeiras histórias da dupla mais famosa do gênero de Espada e Magia (a partir dessa resenha, vou usar esse termo para falar de Sword and Sorcery).O livro contém as seguintes histórias “Sea Magic” (1977), “The Mer She” (1978), “The Curse of the Smalls and the Stars” (1983) ,”The [...]

    • Steven says:

      Michael has BCE

    • Eldad says:

      I really wanted to like these books. I first heard about them while I was in high school in the ‘80s, but I was never able to find them in bookstores and I had forgotten about them for a long time. & fixed that for me.I’m writing only one review for all of the books because my overall impression of them remains the same through most of the stories. The books remain oddly stagnant in some respects, and they vary wildly in others. Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser are almost comically trite as [...]

    • Peter Carrier says:

      The Last Chapter by Leiberd more's the pity. Even though this story is not quite up to snuff with the earlier entries, it still works. Yes, it could have been shorter. Yes, it could have included fewer overt sexual references, especially concerning the younger female characters. That having been said, the story as a whole does a remarkable job of painting a picture of The Twain as men coming into middle age, with all the changes in drive, identity and personality therein. Sadly, the cooling off [...]

    • Lee Broderick says:

      Fritz Leiber's final Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser book follows directly on from Swords and Ice Magic and is one of the most cohesive volumes in the series. For that reason, I found it to be better than some of the others and, indeed, far better than its immediate predecessor. Lieber's all-too-human heroes settled down in that volume and here we're given pause to ponder what that means exactly. Do heroes ever retire? For that matter, what of all their past sexual conquests? Presumably some of them [...]

    • Jonathan Oliver says:

      I really wish I could say that I enjoyed this, that it was a fitting send-off for two of the greatest heroes to have graced the literature of sword and sorcery, that it showed Leiber at his best and that it provided as much enjoyment as did such brilliant stories as Ill Met in Lankhmar and Swords of Lankhmar. However, this is not how I want to remember the father of sword and sorcery, and one of the finest writers of weird fiction. There are flashes of Leiber's linguistic brilliance, punchy dial [...]

    • Antonis says:

      2.5 / 5 This is probably one of the weakest books in the series. But I suppose if one has read the first 6 then the 7th and final one is a necessity by this time. All of this book's stories take place on or around Rime Isle where our adventurous duo of the Gray Mouser and Fafhrd have ended up. This is sadly in stark contrast to the free flowing style of their earlier adventures or the rich and bustling and extremely interesting setting of the city of Lankhmar that had been used often before. Whi [...]

    • Patrick says:

      I first read Leiber's stories of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser when I was in my early teens, and enjoyed them immensely, mainly for their lightness and sense of humor. As this final book did not exist then, I did not read it, but I recently came across it in a used bookstore and decided to delve back in. Unfortunately, either Leiber's prose has not aged well, or I haven't - he takes forever to get to the point, is overly excited by BDSM and other sexual innuendo, and, most importantly, has removed [...]

    • Fantasy Literature says:

      The Knight and Knave of Swords is the last collection of Fritz Leiber’s LANKHMAR stories about those two loveable rogues, Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. I had read all of the LANKHMAR stories up to this point but it took me a while to open this book because I just wasn’t ready for it to be over. Neil Gaiman says something similar in his introduction to The Knight and Knave of Swords and I’m sure that most of Leiber’s fans feel the same way. I know I can re-read these stories at any time, bu [...]

    • Roberto Calas says:

      I am very sorry that this book was the first exposure I had to Fritz Leiber. It's imaginative enough and you can see flashes of brilliance here and there, but for the most part it is a self-indulgent, uninteresting, slow-moving series of stories about Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser on Rime Island. The entire story is narrated to us in super-distant omniscient third person. I felt as if my half-senile grandfather were telling me a story about his old crazy friends, except his old crazy friends weren' [...]

    • Commodore Tiberius Q. Handsome says:

      Fritz Leiber invented the term "sword and sorcery", and he was the finest author the genre has ever had. In fact he was, in my opinion, the finest author of fantasy period. I rank him above Tolkien, Howard and Moorcock, never mind Martin or Jordan. I've read him described as a "master prose stylist", and the description is apt indeed. Fritz Leiber was, simply, a terrific, extremely talented writer with a true love of language and a prodigious, playful, incredibly unique style. The odd, absurd, w [...]

    • gazoo says:

      The thrill is gone. Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser were right up there with Conan and Elric of Melnibone as my fave fantasy heroes and tales. I picked this up at a used bookstore to get a jolt from the past instead I received a dull thud. The tale was overly drawn out (you dig and you dig and you dig) and sluggish to read lacking the vitality and bravado of the earlier gems. My bones felt as heavy as these two heroes in their retirement years when i finished. The day the author cut off Fafhrd's hand [...]

    • Travis says:

      Fafhard and the Grey Mouser are now respectable, married businessmen, content to be settled and enjoying their wealth and leisure time.Oh, if only it was that easy! They still can't help stumbling upon magical things or grabbing the attention of various mystical beings.One last romp for those two great fantasy heroes, now with their very tolerant wives, and slightly baffled and anxious chief assistants dragged along. The last story is every bit as fantastic, fun and witty as the first and the on [...]

    • Blind_guardian says:

      The final chapter in the adventures of Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser, Knight and Knave of Swords is overall a fine bookend to the classic series that inspired Dungeons and Dragons. There are a few flaws, however. Leiber sometimes lurches into purple prose, throwing out run-on sentences that last for four or five lines and jerk the reader out of the story. Despite this, the stories in this volume make a fine addition to the heroes' adventures, as both learn to deal with growing old, settling down, a [...]

    • M says:

      The stories contained in this volume are okay, but definitely not as good as those in the earlier books. The last and longest one especially suffers from being rather disappointing, as the premise of the Mouser being trapped underground while Fafhrd is whisked into the sky upon an airship are largely used as framing devices for weird erotica and other such things that don't really match what I want out of a fantasy story. The concept of the sky kingdom is interesting but sadly is barely develope [...]

    • Nicolas says:

      Dernier tome des aventures de notre paire de héros préférés. Ils sont un peu vieillissants, et l'auteur encore plus, qui se complaît dans le souvenir des conquêtes passées et l'énumération des aventures précédentes. Et si la dernière nouvelle reprend le flambeau des aventures, les aventuriers y sont plus passifs, et plus libidineux. Pas leur meilleur tome, donc, mais une lecture de vacances correcte.

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