Edge of Irony: Modernism in the Shadow of the Habsburg Empire

Edge of Irony Modernism in the Shadow of the Habsburg Empire Among the brilliant writers and thinkers who emerged from the multicultural and multilingual world of the Austro Hungarian Empire were Joseph Roth Robert Musil and Ludwig Wittgenstein For them the

  • Title: Edge of Irony: Modernism in the Shadow of the Habsburg Empire
  • Author: Marjorie Perloff
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 208
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Among the brilliant writers and thinkers who emerged from the multicultural and multilingual world of the Austro Hungarian Empire were Joseph Roth, Robert Musil, and Ludwig Wittgenstein For them, the trauma of World War I included the sudden loss of the geographical entity into which they had been born in 1918, the empire was dissolved overnight, leaving Austria a small,Among the brilliant writers and thinkers who emerged from the multicultural and multilingual world of the Austro Hungarian Empire were Joseph Roth, Robert Musil, and Ludwig Wittgenstein For them, the trauma of World War I included the sudden loss of the geographical entity into which they had been born in 1918, the empire was dissolved overnight, leaving Austria a small, fragile republic that would last only twenty years before being annexed by Hitler s Third Reich In this major reconsideration of European modernism, Marjorie Perloff identifies and explores the aesthetic world that emerged from the rubble of Vienna and other former Habsburg territories an Austro Modernism that produced a major body of drama, fiction, poetry, and autobiography.Perloff explores works ranging from Karl Kraus s drama The Last Days of Mankind and Elias Canetti s memoir The Tongue Set Free to Ludwig Wittgenstein s notebooks and Paul Celan s lyric poetry Throughout, she shows that Austro Modernist literature is characterized less by the formal and technical inventions of a modernism familiar to us in the work of Joyce and Pound, Dada and Futurism, than by a radical irony beneath a seemingly conventional surface, an acute sense of exile, and a sensibility erotic and quixotic than that of its German contemporaries Skeptical and disillusioned, Austro Modernism prefers to ask questions rather than formulate answers.
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      Posted by:Marjorie Perloff
      Published :2019-06-19T10:56:08+00:00

    280 Comment

    • James Klagge says:

      This is a group of 6 essays, each on a different author, all of whom had some connection to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. I was already quite familiar with 3 of them--Kraus, Musil, and Wittgenstein--and pretty unfamiliar with the other 3--Joseph Roth, Elias Canetti, and Paul Celan. So I learned a lot. The unifying theme is that while the empire centered on Vienna, these writers brought a Modernistic perspective from outside of Vienna--from the "edge." Perloff explains that the book makes no attem [...]

    • Alex Kudera says:

      I'm enjoying bouncing around in this book. Often the biographical information is more intriguing than the analysis of the content of the writers' works, but that's no doubt due to their lives on the go between world wars. Authors considered include Joseph Roth, Karl Kraus, Musil, Celan, Canetti, and Wittgenstein. So far, the Musil, Canetti, and Celan sections are my favorites. I hope to tackle at least a long section of The Man Without Qualities before I'm as dead as these ironic Austro-Hungaria [...]

    • Mark says:

      In her examination of the works of Karl Kraus, Robert Musil, Elias Canetti, Joseph Roth, and Paul Celan, author Marjorie Perloff identifies the literature of what she call Austro-Modernism: "the deeply ironic war literature of the defunct, multicultural, and polyglot Austro-Hungarian Empire." This is the literature created by "writers from the far-flung frontiers of the dismembered empire—writers, mostly Jewish, who had received a classical German education, as authorized by the centralized k. [...]

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