Meister Eckhart, from Whom God Hid Nothing: Sermons, Writings, and Sayings

Meister Eckhart from Whom God Hid Nothing Sermons Writings and Sayings This introduction to the writing and preaching of the greatest medieval European mystic contains selections from his sermons treatises and sayings as well as Table Talk the records of his informal

  • Title: Meister Eckhart, from Whom God Hid Nothing: Sermons, Writings, and Sayings
  • Author: Meister Eckhart David O'Neal
  • ISBN: 9781590302798
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Paperback
  • This introduction to the writing and preaching of the greatest medieval European mystic contains selections from his sermons, treatises, and sayings, as well as Table Talk, the records of his informal advice to his spiritual children.
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      Posted by:Meister Eckhart David O'Neal
      Published :2019-09-11T02:36:52+00:00

    254 Comment

    • Debbie Zapata says:

      Like any book on spirituality, this volume of Meister Eckhart's sermons and other works will appeal to some people, confuse some people, and probably bother others. Certain people might even have all of these reactions, depending on which selection they are reading and how much time they spend puzzling through Eckhart's way of writing. He is not always easy to understand, but he was quite popular both in his day and later.Eckhart was a German mystic, born "not long" before 1260. He studied in Pa [...]

    • Matt says:

      Whenever I hear a person carry on about how religion- all religion, but especially western religion- has always been nothing more than a destructive, thought-suppressing and morality-twisting force of pure evil, or at best some sort of contagious mental disorder or metaphorical crutch or peoples' opiate, I find that I can only quietly shake my head. Had I not read Eckhart and other sky-blue souled mystics like him, I suppose my opinion would be different but the wisdom of the man From Whom God H [...]

    • Edward says:

      Meister Eckhart is another name I picked up reading Huxley's Perennial Philosophy, in which he is quoted extensively. Born in the Holy Roman Empire in the 13th century, little is known of this cleric's life aside from his sermons and sayings. He was apparently revered by the common people for his wisdom and willingness to search for it anywhere, so naturally he was accused of heresy by the church. They at least had the decency to wait until after his death to make it official.This is a short boo [...]

    • Sobi says:

      "What is truth? Truth is something so noble that if God could turn aside from it, I could keep to the truth and let God go."/

    • Reed says:

      Meister Eckhart is one of my favorite mystics. He does well in elucidating the subtlest intuitions with so few words. One of my favorites: "Hearer and heard are one in the eternal Word." Eckhart's thoughts on suffering, detachment, emptiness, and culminating unity with "Godhead" are, from what I've gathered, reminiscent of eastern Vedantic and Buddhist meditative practices and phenomenology; so, if you're into comparative theology, you may find some interesting points of comparison between the t [...]

    • C says:

      This is a great introduction to Eckhart's thoughts and work. He is clearly so influential to many --you can see lots of his ideas in Luther's writings and later mystics. This little volume starts with short sayings, and works up to longer pieces. I read it as a morning devotional and got a lot out of it.

    • Klelly says:

      holy f, this is the best megabus reading. currently i am at least a few sacred moments closer to giving myself up to the ultimate unknown. goals-to be both knowing and unknowingto be objectless in eternity and in timeget out of (GOD __)s waydo all i do without a single why always making first rate progress

    • Melissa Barbosa says:

      Simply wonderful. Surely a book to read over and over again.

    • Jason Crane says:

      I'm fascinated by mystics. This brief introduction to Eckhart is a good place to start. It's easy to see why he's remained popular for hundreds of years, and why his Christian mysticism is so appealing to Buddhists.

    • Ippolit says:

      Sola Gloria Deibut i can see where Heidegger got a lot of his ideas.

    • Jake says:

      Meister Eckhart was a 11th-12th century theologian whose views got him posthumously excommunicated. I've recently seen him referenced by Joseph Campbell and Carl Jung, so I thought I'd have a look. He's pretty Buddhist-like for being a Catholic. He says that you should try to attain detachment and nothingness to allow God to work through you, at which point he kind of implies that you pretty much are God. He had some interesting ideas, but overall, I was bored."What is truth? Truth is something [...]

    • Brett Folkman says:

      I really enjoyed the writings of Meister Eckhart, but found the introduction very superficial and lacking much detail. I also felt there was only a small sampling of his teachings and writings, so I'm buying a much larger comprehensive book containing much more of his writings, which I thought this book would have included. It's a very small book, just enough to wet the appetite, but not satisfy. Brett Folkman, Doctor of Ministry

    • Tammiw says:

      I got this book after listening to an interview with John O'Donohoue on On Being. He suggested it as source material. I just couldn't get into it this time around. I'll have to stick to rereading Anam Cara for now.

    • Bill Tucker says:

      They forgot to give credit to Bizarro and Yoda for translating this from Medieval German. Yikes! I didn't finish, but I could see the writing on the walld even there the syntax was terrible! A different edition I get will now? ;/

    • Paige says:

      Five Books: fivebooks/recommended/whom

    • Fred Kohn says:

      Blech! Forget this guy. If you want a good medieval Christian mystic, read John of the Cross.

    • Cara Meredith says:

      I wanted to like him more than I did, but let's just face it: he's not my favorite desert father.

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