Whiskey Galore

Whiskey Galore Love makes the world go round Not at all Whisky makes it go round twice as fast The hilarious story of wartime bootlegging in the Scottish highlands in this classic comic wartime novel

  • Title: Whiskey Galore
  • Author: Compton Mackenzie
  • ISBN: 9780745141473
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Audio
  • Love makes the world go round Not at all Whisky makes it go round twice as fast The hilarious story of wartime bootlegging in the Scottish highlands, in this classic comic wartime novel.
    • Ö Whiskey Galore || ✓ PDF Download by × Compton Mackenzie
      482 Compton Mackenzie
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      Posted by:Compton Mackenzie
      Published :2020-01-12T15:23:42+00:00

    135 Comment

    • Lance Greenfield says:

      This book is very amusing, and it is based upon a true story. It gives a great insight into why the simple lives of Highlanders and Islanders are to be so admired and envied.The SS Cabinet Minister runs aground on the rocks of one of the Hebridean islands. The locals, naturally, take advantage of the availability of the ship's cargo: whisky. The authorities have other ideas about what should happen to this precious cargo.The conflict which ensues, and some of the cunning methods that the locals [...]

    • Lynne King says:

      This was an excellent book about an island. Cecily reminded me of this author in her review on DHL just now in one of his short stories on islands.

    • Leslie says:

      I waffled between 3 & 4 stars so I guess 3.5* The reason I waffled so much is that I found the plot hilarious but had some trouble with the Scot dialects (I have trouble reading dialects of all kinds). The interspersed Gaelic didn't give me as much trouble as my edition had a glossary of Gaelic terms with how to pronounce them & their meaning.Here are some examples of the dialect (these are fairly clear as to their meaning but illustrate the way the dialects were written):" 'I'm sorry, C [...]

    • Griselda says:

      I grew up with the Ealing Comedy black and white film of this book and have always known the story. The book turned out to be a disappointment. Full of redundant detail, the tale moves at snail's pace weighted down by quite pointless episodes and dialogue which would have been better rendered as reported speech. Compton Mackenzie's style tends to the trite in description with an irritatingly self-conscious and pompous diction - who has ever 'doffed' a dressing gown? Worse, he indulges himself to [...]

    • Gerry says:

      Sergeant-Major Alfred Ernest Odd returns to the Hebridean islands of Great and Little Todday in wartime and finds them in the middle of rationing with food supplies very low. Not only are food supplies low but whisky is almost non-existent and the islanders are not happy with the situation.In addition the home guard are under suspicion as they are deemed to be not doing their jobs properly and the locals think that Odd has come to spy upon them and report back to headquarters.There are a variety [...]

    • Ian Brydon says:

      I see from the inscription on the flyleaf of my copy of this book that I bought it in August 1981. I have a recollection of having read it, and the story is familiar from having seen the film version, but I could not remember anything about the book itself. i read it again as I was going back to the Scottish Highlands, and thought it might be amusing.Like the over eager knight at the end of 'Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade', I chose poorly. At the risk of being branded a heretic, this is quit [...]

    • James Oden says:

      I have start off by saying that I'm a singer in a Celtic band and I don't just sing about whiskey, but I love the stuff. Reading this book for me was like finding myself surrounded by a room full of kindred spirits. There were so many things to love about this book, but really at its heart was the culture of Gaelic speaking Scotland. It is culture where nothing is ever too serious, yet the passion for life is the poetry of the air they breathe. Music, dancing, and just good Craic with friends is [...]

    • Catherine says:

      The picture on the cover and my vague memories of the film are of people desperately trying to hide whisky from the excise men, but that is merely one day's events in a very good book. Much of it explores the relationships between islanders when they are in the trying times of an alcohol drought and the effect of a sudden, unexpected, but not entirely legal solution. I've been told many times that one way to make a novel is to get a set of characters, put them in a challenging situation and see [...]

    • Simon says:

      Though this started out quite slowly, the more I read the more I enjoyed it. Whisky Galore belongs to that genre of writing about the country wherein officious city-types are constantly being wrong-footed by the wily locals, so there are plenty of laughs at the expense of the uptight authority figures. There are also some funny satirical jabs at military incompetence, puritan hypocrisy, and overbearing parents. I hear the 1949 movie version is great, so I'm looking forward to checking that out t [...]

    • Laura says:

      Cute story about the shenanigans that ensue when the whisky (and, for that matter, beer) supply ran out on the island due to wartime rationing. Certainly a crisis in Highland (or perhaps better island) Scotland. The fun begins when a ship, with 15,000 cases of whisky onboard, runs aground. Definitely a product of its time, but also an enjoyable read.

    • Jonkers Jonkers says:

      Really enjoyed this. Loved the complete obsession with Whisky (although I can't stand the stuff). Watched the film afterwards (the original) and enjoyed that too.

    • Lori says:

      Delightful village comedy set in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Lots of laughs and quirky characters trying to keep track of their whiskey rations while overbearing parents try to prevent their offspring from tying the knot. Things get out of hand when a very thirsty group of Scottish Highlanders find themselves in a whiskey drought and the hilarity begins when a cargo ship carrying 50,000 bottles of whiskey gets stranded on their island. This is a very light and entertaining romp set in Scotla [...]

    • Diana says:

      It's a book about whisky, so how could it not be a fun book to read. ;)

    • Judith Lewis says:

      A feelgood, rather quaint book, very much of its period [late 1940s]. Based on the true shipwreck of the SS Politician off the coast of the Hebridean island of Eriskay, and the remarkable disappearance of its cargo of prime whisky. I suspect there is a good deal of truth in the story, whatever the author's disclaimer! Mackenzie knew the Outer Hebrides well, so I guess the book is likely to have a degree of truth in the social history it represents; it is certainly accurate in its depiction of th [...]

    • Katy Noyes says:

      A bit disappointed really.I loved the Ealing film as a child, and maybe I'm misremembering, but it was really funny. The book seems to have the potential to be amusing, and sometimes manages this. On two little Scottish islands in World War Two (one Catholic, one protestant) whisky is running out. Providentially, a supply ship runs aground nearby containing thousands of cases of the said product. Before long, almost everyone is 'salvaging', and a lot happier. Only a few killjoys are trying to st [...]

    • Simon says:

      I can't give this anything less than five stars. It's been a hoot. I've laughed my way through it and I'm going to miss it all the way through to when the dvd of the 1949 film arrives. It isn't worth 5 stars for the writing, the characters are over-drawn to the extent of approaching caricature, the setting is idealised and, like Dylan Thomas's The Outing, makes a bunch of men getting drunk sound almost fabulous; my experience is that it is rarely thus. But it has magic. It pulls together it's di [...]

    • Melanie says:

      I cannot believe that I had not read this book before. I loved it. Amazingly it did not feel dated at all. I have read a lot of books from the period and they often feel dated (still good, mind you) but this one feels quite fresh (for the lack of a better word). It's a true classic I know, but I had not expected it to be so funny. I was laughing loads and reading passages to my poor husband. I shall be hunting down now a nice vintage edition for the book shelf. This is a keeper.

    • Kingfan30 says:

      The cover of this book was interesting, I was not sure if I needed to put on some 3D glasses or if I needed a drink of Whisky to see it properly!There were a lot of characters on this story which made it difficult to follow at times. Also it was written in the dialect of the area which took a bit of getting used too. The story on the whole was quite entertaining and I was pleased when George eventually stood up to his mum.

    • Hancock says:

      This is fun light reading.

    • Naomi Slade says:

      A re-read. Always enjoyable, very much of its time!

    • Marie Willingham says:

      This was recommended to me as 'Katie Morag for grown ups'. I'm a sucker for Katie Morag. I loved this. Original, engaging and funny.

    • Marie-Anne says:

      Nice enough, but it's no Para Handy.

    • Mel says:

      A fun and funny read, and it's about whisky. I enjoyed it immensely. Good stuff!

    • John Mccullough says:

      This charming book first published in 1947 is a fictionalized version of an actual event that occurred off the Scottish island of Eriskay in 1941. During WW II and before the U S entered the war, Great Britain was in dire need of armaments which it could not produce for itself in sufficient quantities, nor could Britain pay for the armaments entirely in cash. The deal eventually brokered was that the U S would ship munitions in convoys of “Liberty Ships” to Britain. In return, Britain would [...]

    • Graham says:

      So lovely to find this book on holiday with the translations (and rough pronunciations) of some of the Gaelic phrases used.This is a sweet little book. It's more of a film script than a story as there is *a lot of* dialogue, some of which is just the reader listening in to the burble of the characters. The central plot is about how an island community during the second world war is losing its community cohesion because of a lack of whisky: weddings are postponed, people die of the shock, even th [...]

    • Marina says:

      Britain is at war with Germany, but a bunch of booze-loving islanders only care about salvaging a cargo of whisky on a shipwreck and having a rollicksome time with it. I class this book as a fun read, the English-language text of which is interspersed, pleasantly so, with Scottish Gaelic terms and phrases. Other than that, I had a hard time taking it seriously. Actually, I thought the story, which takes place during the war with Hitler, was slightly ludicrous, but, then again, I was prepared to [...]

    • Davidg says:

      An entertaining read. I loved the film. The book is different in a number of ways, it doesn't have the same chase element as the authorities try to get hold of the whiskey. What it does have is more of the different characters and the difference in philosophy between the islanders and the mainlanders.

    • Robert says:

      A quaint, dryly amusing, and historically interesting novel, but not a very good one. The details of life in wartime Britain are fascinating, the Gaelic expressions (with handy glossary and pronunciation guide) and humor were a treat, but the story as a whole has no driving force, and the lack of impetus and direction results in an ending that is unusual and unsatisfactory.

    • Derek Collett says:

      Michael Balcon was a genius, assuming of course that it was he who saw the cinematic potential in this novel and oversaw the project that concluded in the Ealing Comedy that we know and love today. The book though is a boring mess. Overlong, unfunny, inconsequential and incredibly rude and patronising towards Highlanders (the phonetic rendering of their speech quickly becomes annoying, not helped by the many typos in my Penguin edition). There are a few good chapters but these are heavily outwei [...]

    • Stargazer says:

      I have to say my reading of this was enhanced by an old memory of having watched the movie when i was wee so i wanted to read the book as the film had stuck in my mind. i did chuckle here and there but think i'd like to watch the movie again as it must have brought the characters alive so well.

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